Ozark Encyclopedia – M – Moon

Silver connection to the Moon – “It is always a good idea to be touching a silver coin whenever you see the moon, and it may be for this reason that rings hammered from silver coins are so popular in some sections.” ~Randolph OMF 330 Medicine and the Moon - “Medicine works best when there... Continue Reading →

Ozark Encyclopedia – M – Mistletoe

Mistletoe - Phoradendron leucarpum Parts used: foliage, berries Traditional uses: Poisonous. 'Tea ooze' used to bathe head for headache. Infusion used for high blood pressure. Compounds containing leaves and branches used for lung trouble. Used for dizziness - “Mistletoe leaves are made into a remedy for dizziness and head noises.” ~Randolph OMF 114 Used in... Continue Reading →

Ozark Encyclopedia – M – Milk

Mother’s milk to treat sore eyes – “If a baby's eyes are sore, the mother's milk is regarded as the best possible lotion.” ~Randolph OMF 138 Sweet cream for eyes – “Young girls often rub sweet cream into their eyes, but I am not sure if this is a medicine or a cosmetic.” ~Randolph OMF... Continue Reading →

Ozark Encyclopedia – M – Mayapple

Mayapple, American Mandrake - Podophyllum peltatum Parts used: root, fruit Traditional uses: Poisonous. Root soaked in whiskey and taken for rheumatism and as a purgative. Boiled root eaten as a purgative. Powdered root used on ulcers and sores. Fruit used for food. “Podophyllum is a medicine of most extensive service; its greatest power lies in... Continue Reading →

Ozark Encyclopedia – M – Manure

Chicken manure for pneumonia - “Some old settlers make poultices of chicken manure mixed with lard as a treatment for pneumonia; it is said that the dung of black chickens is best.” ~Randolph OMF 94 Sheep manure tea for measles - “Nanny tea, consisting of sheep manure and hot water, with a little sugar, is... Continue Reading →

Ozark Encyclopedia – M – Madstone

For treating rabies – “The madstone treatment for rabies was once popular in many parts of the United States and is still well known in the Ozarks. The madstones I have seen are porous and resemble some sort of volcanic ash, but the natives all claim that they were taken from the entrails of deer.... Continue Reading →

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