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From Vance Randolph’s “Ozark Magic and Folklore”:

“In November, 1934, the Associated Press carried a long story about ‘The Ghost of Paris’ a specter which has been seen at intervals in Paris, Missouri, for more than seventy years. The “Ghost of Paris” was a woman, tall, dressed in black, carrying some sort of wand or cane in her hand. She appeared every year about the middle of October and was seen now and then about the town until spring. The story identified this ghost as the jilted sweetheart of a Confederate soldier; on her deathbed she swore to haunt her faithless lover and the whole town forever. The ‘Ghost of Paris’ was never known to injure anybody, but she frightened children into hysterics. Even grown men, in several cases, had been known to run down the middle of the street, yelling for help. It seems that the ghost has not been seen in Paris since 1934, and some people have suggested that the newspaper publicity somehow exorcised it.”