If you can’t tell from some of my previous posts I’m a big fan of goldenrod. It figures into a lot of the medicinal preparations that I make. It also helps that there are around 25 species here in Arkansas. It’s everywhere! But it’s a beautiful problem to have. Here are a few common species:

The benefits of goldenrod are numerous. Tall Goldenrod is the most commonly used species, mostly because of the large flower heads it produces and because it can be found in abundance in easy to reach places. The leaves and flowers can be used for sore throats, colds, coughs, loosening chest congestion, and for kidney problems. Topically the flowers can be used in balms and oils for rashes, burns, bug bites, psoriasis, eczema, and as a skin toner.

All the goldenrods have bitter and astringent properties and can be used when these constituents are required. According to the “Modern Herbal” it is “Aromatic, stimulant, carminative. Golden Rod is an ingredient in the Swiss Vulnerary, faltrank. It is astringent and diuretic and efficacious for stone in the bladder. It is recorded that in 1788 a boy of ten, after taking the infusion for some months, passed quantities of gravel, fifteen large stones weighing up to 1 1/4 OZ., and fifty over the size of a pea. It allays sickness due to weak digestion. In powder it is used for cicatrization of old ulcers. It has been recommended in many maladies, as it is a good diaphoretic in warm infusion, and is in this form also helpful in dysmenorrhoea and amenorrhoea. As a spray and given internally, it is of great value in diphtheria.”

According to herbalist Susan Weed “One or two large handfuls of crushed leaves and flowers, steeped in a quart of boiling water for thirty minutes makes a tea that can be used hot, with honey, to counter allergies (especially pollen allergies), fevers, sore throats, coughs, colds and the flu; or taken cold to relieve colic in babies, and gas in adults. Dried mint and/or yarrow are tasty, and useful, additions when making goldenrod flower tea.”